Powdered and crystalline alcohol - SB 501

Powdered and crystalline alcohol - SB 501

New Futures supports the prohibition of powdered alcohol due to concerns regarding youth. We oppose any product that would make alcohol more quickly absorbed by the body (snorting or vaping).

1st
New Hampshire's national rank of illicit drug and alcohol dependence or abuse among ages 18-25 (NHPR)
32.9%
NH high school students surveyed had used alcohol in last 30 days (2013 YRBS)
27 states
Already introduced bans on the sale of powdered alcohol in their legislatures

New Futures supports the prohibition of powdered alcohol due to concerns regarding youth. We oppose any product that would make alcohol more quickly absorbed by the body (snorting or vaping). We are actively monitoring the progress of SB 501.

 

In March 2015, the U.S. Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau approved the revised labels for Palcohol, a powdered alcohol product. This allows the product to be sold legally in the United States, unless otherwise prohibited. Alaska, Louisiana, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Delaware all statutorily prohibit the sale of powdered alcohol. An additional 27 states have introduced bans on the sale of powdered alcohol in their states’ legislatures.

What’s so bad about powdered alcohol?

This product may make it easier to consume more alcohol at a quicker rate. It could increase the proof value of alcoholic drinks by being added to a spirit such as vodka rather than water.

There are concerns that it could be consumed more quickly (snorted or vaped). This is important because the method of how a substance enters the body (smoking vs. injecting vs. imbibing) has a direct relationship to how soon you feel the effects. We oppose any product that would make alcohol more quickly absorbed by the body, giving the individual and those around them less time to respond to over intoxication. This is especially true with novice drinkers who may not know their body’s tolerance or a novelty product that users may be unfamiliar with.

The risk of youth abusing powdered alcohol in New Hampshire…

In the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey for New Hampshire, 32.9% of New Hampshire high school students surveyed had used alcohol in the last 30 days. Our prevalence rates for youth substance use are some of the highest in the nation.

This product may be easier to conceal because it is not liquid or breakable which may be attractive to youth who are already using alcohol at alarming rates—let’s not add another product that would be easier to conceal or make it easier to consume larger quantities faster. We are also concerned about how easily such a product could be concealed in a bar or restaurant environment. This product would make it difficult for on premise alcohol licenses to follow best practices to prevent overserving.

 

on may 11th the full house voted "inexpedient to legislate" (Kill the bill) on a voice vote.

Bill Status
  • Committee
  • Public Hearing
  • Executive Session
  • Full Body Vote
  • Committee
  • Public Hearing
  • Executive Session
  • Full Body Vote